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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the business is in the mid-sized to smaller communities who have even fewer resources than the large cities, less expertise. if you take options off the table, it will be, well, what we've done for the last 40 years, and right now we have some real challenges. so any good manager is going to want to have a maximum number of options. allbee: you've got to have a serious conversation with your constituency about what it costs to deliver the service that you're required to deliver and to deliver the service that they want. paolicelli: and i think, ultimately, the responsibility is going to be down to the user of this commodity. it costs money to operate these systems. there's a need to continually invest in these systems. there's going to be new regulations. it's all going to cost money. allbee: for all practical purposes, people are going to have to pay about twice as much for these services as they currently do. because a lot of the pipe that went in, a lot of the plants that went in, went in with very sizable portions of federal grant money, mechanisms that are no longer in place. narrator:
that there is no such thing. i mean, you know, we are unique but we're not that unique. there are other large city departments around, not just the country but the world, that deal with multiple floors, multiple functions, multiple departments. >> example, in oakland, they only submit the job. san jose also submit a job. los angeles also submit a job. it's a little bit different in our case. therefore we are still looking, doesn't mean we give up the idea. >> great. >> deputy director sweeney, you were just going to say --. >> i think if we ever came across a system or heard of a system that's worked, bring it to us and talk to us about it. >> we had los angeles building and safety up two months ago and i showed them the fifth floor, they were very surprised about the ease with which you can come in. they say you make an appointment and you come in at 11:00, 10 after 11:00 and you meet the building inspector or the engineer, then you can go over the counter, but you have to have an appointment. second thing they were surprised about is some of the size of the jobs that we'll plan check over t
they could not put a park there because it was all sand dunes. people were pushing for a large city park in other places. it was a political compromise. >> between lincoln and fulton and the beach. >> you're saying, why did they decide that exact plot? they brought someone from new york to come up with a park plan. they eventually made it a rectangle. they had the panhandle part. the panhandle was the same with as golden gate park, but there was dealmaking going on between park commissioners and they decided they would buy the land and cut off part of the panhandle. >> the development of lincoln park is interesting. you can see the cemetery. >> on the map, it is a cemetery. >> what happened to that and all of the bodies? >> they decided around the turn of the century the land was too valuable to bury people. where uss is now there were four cemeteries. they moved all of the cemetery's out -- cemeteries out. the heir did not want to move one of the places. there are two people -- two places where people are buried in the city. the other ones were moved out. >> the big scandal of lincoln p
was the bridge to the park and we are building a very large new city park 75 feet in the air it needs very large connections to it to ensure that it's well used and so there is so much to like approximate it and one of the thing though, i'm a little concerned aboutship inclusionary housing how it related on this site but it's not something that need to be solved now and it in no way distracts from our support of this project it should move ahead and it's a terrific addition to this evolving neighborhood and it's providing a lot of to the goals we have adopted to the city. please adopt this project. >> commissioners michael from construction counsel. i'll be brief and light i'm from a by trade i started in this career on high scale race and project and this produces -- [inaudible] of my kind and i have described this to a young connectionor at a meeting a couple of weeks ago and this is a probably we like even more and we are not the only ones who have enthusiastic about this and who have stuck it out and sat through the western gnoma plan discussion and they wanted to make sure their support
district, but for the city at-large and for a point of reference, much of the monies that were spent last year were spent reconverting the horseman campus to continue to develop the former bryant campus for international high school. to redo the isa campus and to finish building the brand-new tech 21 career building at the john o'connell campus. so there is a lot of really exciting projects that this work has funded and next year we have a number of similar projects targeted including trying to replace the final remaining modular what's buildings that we are renting with permanent classroom buildings. so with that, i would ask if there have any questions that you might have and hopefully you will approve the report. thank you. >> thank you; there are no public speakers for this item. any comments from the board or superintendents? >> no, but i read it. >> it's right here. >> i move the recommendations. >> we already did. roll call, please. >> have i one question? >> commissioner? >> thank you president yee. this report is annual or every five years? >> it's annual. >> it's ac
which were moving into areas it had been difficult for many years, and so what is it the city can, would do in order to -- for that not to happen? >> planning. >> there is obviously a large silence here. plaps the director -- >> it's a private corporate decision to stay open or not. the question i think that is appropriate for the city and the successor agency depending on the location whether other stores can fill those spaces? and one of the things -- just to back up i had the same concern. those stores represent an opportunity and what we were calling food deserts in the city for a long time so i was going to talk to the office of economic development to work with if not them with potentially other stores to take those spaces and if fresh and easy wanted to lease them to other operator versus just walking away. >> one thing i observed and we talked about retail, large grocery stores that my observation was fresh and easy in a city other than san francisco in other food starved neighborhoods, food store starved neighborhoods i saw a certain lack of relevance for the type of foods the
for itself and the city at large mountain on mountain of trouble. to build districts that are custom made for easy crime is idiotic. yes, that is what we do. this was written in 1961. public peace, the street and the sidewalk is not kept primarily by the police. it's kept by intricate unconscious voluntary controls and standards among the people themselves and enforced by the people themselves. no amount of police can enforce civilization or the normal casual enforcement of it has broken down. a well used city street is apt to be a safe city street. a deserted street is apt to be unsafe. there must be eyes upon the street. eyes belonging to those we call the natural proprietors of the street. the building on a main street equipped to handle strangers and ensure the safety of residents and strangers must be oriented to the street. the natural proprietors can not turn their backs and leave it blind. jane jacobs was a life student of urban plan scption ensured criticism going into a male dosm nated field. they called her a housewife and a crazy dame and organized grass-roots effort
hill, at one time second street ended at howard. at that point, there was a large hill. the wealthy people of san francisco lived on top of the hill, and churches were built along howard. then the city fathers in the 1920's let us knock down the hill, let us extend second street, and it finishes at the ballpark now. as you move south along second, that whole area, you get into rock. many of these old warehouse buildings, as you approach rincon hill, are sitting on rock. if you go down to king street, which is the street that fronts the ballpark, if you cross the street from the ballpark and the look on the sidewalk, there is actually a little brass plates that depict the location of the bluff that existed, the transition from the beach to the vertical cliffs that existed at second street. at second and king. all of that was taken down, and they have built warehouses. now at his condominium developments. and portions of mission bay. the first building of mission bay, third and townsend -- i am sorry, third and king, it is a rock site. if you go further into mission bay, it goes from
waste away from the hub of civilization, which enabled cities to grow. . >> you have a large bowl, a drive motor and another motor with a planetary gearbox with differential pressure inside there. the large mass up there spinning separating the solids from the liquid. we have to prevent about once a month, we go in there grease those, change the oil, check the vibration levels. the operators can tell just by the hum of that machine that it's a harmonic noise emitted that it's out of balance and the machine needs to be cleaned. it will start vibrating and we have vibration analysis machines that will come over here and check the levels. so it's kind of an on-going thing that you have to stay on top of on a daily basis. >> handled properly, you take organic residuals, as we call them, that are leftovers of our society and turn them back into some energy. and we have another ability to take that sludge and get a nutrient value for crops there. we actually are running a kind of composting energy recovery system. >> well, this is a dirty job. we try to do it safely and we try to do it
the concerns and this is one of the sites that we have seen art supplying for large enough and the planning commission approved it on a city wide endeavor with the supervisors and i would like to give kudos david chew and theirs the last at some point i go ahead get to tell you the purple building is a resource we will be loosing that and proposition c limiting the addition of affordable housing that is going to effect thing with the western sonoma plan and so that is unfortunate that, that, path was taken but this is a good project and encourage it.. >> that your commissioners gym meek cofrom south of market and funny finding myself here supporting the recommendation of tim colon and i think serve on board supporting it project it was a unique situation when sandy miller and her class of architecture of students from cal polly were working with task force before still came on the pictures and they had been assigned this very same parking lot and they were created what kind of uses could go there and that is where the whole concept of a mix of uses came from. planning department in these
until january for the first 6 months of the year so that's where we'll see the large ones, which one the largest is the city attorney's office. so we're waiting for that. just kind of a footnote. next meeting we'll be presenting the first iteration
is highway 101 through the city. this item attributes to several actions. to reflect also the obtainment of a large fta grant. we happily we received a $50 million from the federal transit administration to support the project. part of that funding will be passed over to the authority and part of our previously prop 8 funds will be passed over to mta. this is all to cover some of the work already happened and budgeted for back in the 2010 appropriation as well as reflect the past year. over the past year, the agencies have all done significant work to refine and develop the locally preferred alternative both agencies have been incurred a bit of additional cost. we have also added more consultant support to the budget. the memorandum of agreement will also update the project budget to add about $1.1 million of total project budget to bringing total project cost up to $6.7 million range. again, this additional cost is fully covered by the federal transit administration grant and no additional funding is being sought today. finally this memorandum of agreement, the amendment to this mla pro
sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to keep on pushing data sets that allow us to deal with the sometimes imperfections in city government. to figure it out, where it is we need to take risks, we are we can be more entrepreneurial, where we can be more transparent and frank little more accountable to all of you as the residents and as our customers here in city government. and this is why i am proud tomorrow to help move forward legislation that my staff has been working closely with jay nath and mayor leon that will real i do three things. first of all, it will create a chief data officer because we need one person who is responsible and accountable for moving forward our open data agenda. secondly, we're going to require every department in the city to have a representative who is responsible for data so you can go to our transit agency, our police department, any of our 50 plus departments and know who can help you g
easier for small and large contractors to do business in the city. i want to thank monique and the port for their confidence in public works and for the strong relationship and partnership that we forged through completing this project. i'd like to acknowledge the hard work of vortex, [speaker not understood], john miller and alex with vortex. i'd like to thank matt hughey with [speaker not understood], and i'd like to especially thank my public works team, ray louie, laura lombardi, [speaker not understood], and tim o'sullivan. with them i can tackle the most complex project in san francisco. thank you all. (applause) >> so, as you enjoy this space, first of all, please come back. bring your families. bring your friends. we're proud to have another new space for all of the residents and our favorite dogs who walk along here, as well as the many visitors. as you've heard mentioned today, it has taken a huge community of people to get this done. i'm very pleased to see representatives of the fisherman's wharf community benefit district, the fisherman's wharf restaurant association, all t
lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i believe kroshed the threshold of 140,000 students nationwide and we are working to get to the million and the idea is a million is a tipping point . a million kids in america. that's like one in ten basically in public schools. that gets embedded so over time every september schools are starting with that method to have that agreement, and along the way we're also trying to deliver youth action and educate ideas and teach the schools and districts about social emotional learning because after they see the film they want to know what do we do next? how do we impact that? and that's what i am up to and it's great to be here. >> thanks so much for coming here. we appreciate it. [applause] >> good afternoon everyone. i am rach
and those are the funds that make improvements and make streets better. it's a large chunk of money over the same period of time that obag is providing. the department of public works working with other city department is committed to complete streets. we feel it vital to make the investment . we need to spend even more money just on repaving. the amount of money that we need to meet those commitments is included in the masonic project and broadway project. to meet that commitment, we will need all of them. we will be working with the t.a. staff and especially with the other agencies applied for obag funds in order to make sure we're meeting all of those needs. thanks. >> thank you. >> right now we're over subscribed. what we will actually heard a lot of concerns that you've spoken about today. we are going to look at each the projects. get better refined cost estimates. look to see if there are other sources to still keep us on schedule that deliver the projects that we committed. and move forward on this entire package of projects. i think we're going to try to do that in the next coup
what we used to do was carry the large maps and it took a long time to find the information. >> it saves the city time and money. you are not taking up the time of a particular employee at the assessor's office. you might be doing things more efficient. >> they have it ready to go and say, this is what i want. >> they are finding the same things happening on the phone where people call in and ask, how do i find this information? we say, go to this website and they go and get the information easily. >> a picture tells a thousand stories. some say a map >> good afternoon ladies and gentlemen. for those that haven't please take your seats. again we so appreciate you all gathering on today's peace sunday. we appreciate you taking the time. we are certainly grateful for the special guest which we will come to momentarily. let me dispense with some of the acknowledgments on the on set and grateful to our mayor and our city officials who are here, chief wendy steel, and those from juvenile probation, commanders and briefs and we appreciate each of the city leaders being wit
it is to serves as the transportation director in this great city. we ordered san francisco weather to deep the dust down and we are in a construction site and it's a great time for transportation across the nation largely because of some of the folks you will hear who are to my left and your right. it is also a great time to be in san francisco because we have leadership here in the city that are encouraging innovation, that recognize
and privilege it is to serves as the transportation director in this great city. we ordered san francisco weather to deep the dust down and we are in a construction site and it's a great time for transportation across the nation largely because of some of the folks you will hear who are to my left and your right. it is also a great time to be in san francisco because we have leadership here in the city that are encouraging innovation, that recognize the importance of investment and infrastructure, and there is no better manifestation of that than this project and that prt is man manifested in a way that i can see no more strongly in our great mayor who have been been a public works director, a city administrator, and helped build the city's plan he really gets this stuff. he is really engaged in this stuff. i don't think a week has come gone by that he hasn't asked me when this day is coming and it's a pleasure to introduce our mayor ed lee. >> thank you for your wonderful leadership. over 20-25 years ago when we were struggling with the earthquake, when people in chinatown
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)

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